Thursday, June 16, 2016

Connecting to legacy Sun ILOM with modern clients

The bane of many a system administrator's existence is the remote management capability on their servers. In Sun's case, I'm talking about the ILOM.

(Of course, Sun have had RSC and ALOM and eLOM and maybe some other abominations over time.)

Now, for many purposes, you can just ssh to the ILOM and you're done. On Sun boxes anyway, where you often have serial console redirection and the OS using the serial console.

However, if you want to manage the system fully, you need a proper client. There are a couple of common cases. First, if you need the VGA console (either for a broken OS, or to interact with the BIOS), or if you want to do storage redirection (in other words, you want to remotely present a bootable image).

That's where the fun starts, and you get in a tangled relationship with Java. Often, it ends up being a tale of woe.

And that's on the best of days. With legacy hardware - such as the X4150 - it gets a whole lot more interesting.

Now, while the X4150 is legacy and well past end of life now, it turns out that there was an updated firmware release in 2015. (For POODLE, I think.) If you can, apply this, as it should fix some of the UI compatibility issues with newer browsers. (Not all, I suspect, but if you've tried using a current browser and only got half the GUI then you know what I'm talking about.)

However, that doesn't necessarily mean that the Java application is going to work. There are actually a couple of issues here.

The first is that the application is a signed jar, and the certificate used to sign it has expired. Worse, due to Java's rather chequered security history, current versions have draconian checks in place which you'll run into. To fix, go to the Java Control Panel, down to "Perform signed code verification checks" and change it to "Do not check". Generally, disabling security like this is a bad idea, but in this case it's necessary.

Next, if you start up the application, click through the remaining security dialogs, and try to connect to the console, you'll get a cipher suite mismatch failure. The ILOM is pretty old, and uses SSLv3 which is disabled by default in current Java. You'll need to edit the file (in ${JAVA_HOME}/jre/lib/security/[*]) and comment out two lines - the ones with jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms and jdk.tls.disabledAlgorithms, then run the application again.

With luck, that will at least enable you to get to the console.

If you want storage redirection, then you're in for more fun. For starters, you need to be running Solaris, Linux, or Windows. If you're on a Mac, it's not going to work. You'll need to get yourself another machine, or run a VM with something else installed.

And the other thing is that you need to be running a 32-bit Java Virtual Machine. If you're running Solaris, this rules out Java 8 - you'll have to go back to Java 7. On other platforms, you'll have to make sure you have a 32-bit JVM, which might not be the default and you might have to manually install it.

Oh, and if you're on Linux or Solaris and running OpenJDK (rather than the Oracle builds) then you'll need IcedTea to get the javaws integration. At least with IcedTea you can ignore the Java Control Panel stuff.

[*: On my Mac I discovered that I had 2 different installations of Java. The one that you get if you type "java" isn't the same one used for browser integration and javaws launching. Running /usr/libexec/java_home gave me the wrong one; I ended up looking at the ps output when running the Control Panel to find out the location of the one I really needed.]

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